Tag Archives: treatment

New Legislation Seeks to Help Children of Families Dealing with Substance Abuse

One of the most heart breaking aspects of addiction is the effect it has on children and families. There are approximately 200,000 children in foster care because their parents are addicted. Although there is no question that some form of intervention needs to happen, especially for the wellbeing of the children, just how that should take place is easier said than done.

Congresswoman Kristi Noem of South Dakota recently introduced legislation to help this situation, and she’s getting a lot of support. The bill, H.R. 2857, is called the Supporting Families in Substance Abuse Treatment Act and recently passed the House and is on to the Senate. It seeks to provide funding for treatment programs that help keep families together rather than sending kids off to foster care.

Treatment centers that provide adequate facilities for children to remain with parents during rehabilitation are few and far between. This is despite the evidence shows that keeping children with parents who receive treatment is more effective for both the adults and the kids long-term.

This unprecedented move would help to restore family structures that are so often beyond repair after the child is placed in foster care. Oftentimes the child, who likely has lived with several different families while in the state’s custody, loses the trust and security that the parent is supposed to offer. And while drug abuse certainly reduces that trust, allowing the child to stay with a parent who is willing to go to treatment and get better helps to maintain the trust and security the child needs and deserves.

“I think it would be very hard for the children – or for all of them, probably – to work with each other when that trust has been broken. In that capacity, I was an advocate for the children, and it was very hard, especially when the child can’t trust their own parent or has been hurt so many times because of alcohol and drug abuse or whatever else it may be,” explained Anna Wahcahunka, a counselor at a treatment center that deals with the fall out of parent drug abuse problems.

“Drug treatment programs that keep families together and children out of foster care have proven to produce better outcomes for both the parent and child,” said Rep. Noem in a release. “Even so, government-induced barriers exist that make a family-focused approach difficult. I’m hopeful the Supporting Families in Substance Abuse Treatment Act will offer another evidence-based tool to those on the drug abuse epidemic’s front line, helping them strengthen families and change lives.”

The bill works by providing families that have a parent enrolled in a state-approved treatment facility with income that would have otherwise gone to a foster family. In order to qualify, treatment programs have to offer parenting skills training, parent education and individual and family counseling. The length of the stay can be no longer than 12 months, but many believe this is an adequate amount of time to regain the family structure and start to repair the damage caused by the drug or alcohol abuse.

The magnitude of the drug problem in America still has not yet fully been realized. This is largely due to the number of people who are dependent on or abusing their prescribed medications as well as the more obvious illicit drug use. Tens of millions of people in the country are in need of help, and finding ways to not only create positive change now in terms of rehabilitation and prevention, but also long-term improvements through policy improvements are essential.

Does Smoking Inhibit Recovery?

One of the most common sites to see in a treatment facility is cigarette smoking. Clients and counselors often engage in smoking as a way to temporarily reduce stress, socialize and still feed at least one of their addictions. However, new research is showing that smoking can also be a serious hindrance to maintaining sobriety.

Researchers at Columbia University’s School of Public Health investigated data gathered from 35,000 adults, specifically looking at rate of relapse after treatment. They found that people who smoke before treatment and continue doing so afterward are nearly twice as likely to relapse as non-smokers.

This information is especially interesting because of the current take on smoking in most treatment centers. Since coming off of drugs can be so stressful and patients are often having to work through painful past experiences, smoking is accepted because it is a “lesser” addiction. However, according to this research it can be detrimental.

“If research continues to show a relationship between smoking and relapse to substance use among those in recovery, making tobacco treatment a standard part of treatment for illicit substance use disorders may be a critical service to provide to adults toward improving substance treatment outcomes over the long term,” commented Renee Goodwin, author of the study.

Perhaps some of the indicators of having a compulsive behavior tied to a chemical leaves a pathway open in the brain that makes people more susceptible to relapse. Whereas research into neuroplasticity has shown that the brain can be “re-trained” to create new pathways and behaviors, maintaining an active addiction to nicotine may prevent that re-writing process from occurring.

The Surgeon General’s Report on Addiction

US Surgeon General Calls for Holistic Approach in Addiction Treatment

Surgeon General's Report on Addiction

The US Surgeon General has issued the first report of its kind on the subject of substance abuse. In it, Dr. Vivek Murthy issued a direct call to action to stop what he has said is a “public health crisis of drug and alcohol addiction that is both underappreciated and undertreated.”

US Drug Use and Overdose Statistics

Dr. Murthy pointed out that the number of US deaths from drug overdoses reached 47,055 in 2014, which was a record number according to statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This figure represented a 6.5 percent increase over previous years.

The government has requested additional funds to address the serious issue of drug addiction. President Barack Obama has made a request for additional funding of US$ 1.1 billion to help combat the problem. Opioid painkiller abuse is of particular concern, with drugs such as fentanyl, oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine being at the forefront of the public’s attention.

In 2015, the number of people who have reported either using illegal drugs or misusing prescription drugs has hit 27 million. Close to one-quarter of all adolescents and adults (66 million people) have reported engaging in an episode of binge drinking during the past month.

Early Intervention Important: Surgeon General

Dr. Murthy’s report calls for a holistic approach to taking on the issue of addiction. It should involve a number of entities and organizations, from policy makers and regulators to communities, schools and families. One of Dr. Murthy’s goals is to increase access to existing treatment programs and to expand the number of programs available.

His report also discussed the importance of early intervention in schools to teach children about the dangers of alcohol use. Dr. Murthy pointed out that if a young person has their first drink before they turn 15, they are four times more likely to develop an alcohol problem than if they postponed their first drink to after age 21.

Dr. Murthy’s model for his approach is the 1964 Surgeon General’s report on tobacco. At that time, approximately 42 percent of the US population smoked, but few people recognized the dangers of tobacco products. Through the work of the campaign, the public was made aware of the health consequences of smoking, and the current smoking rate is below 17 percent.

Wrapping up Recovery Month 2016

recoveryAs yet another Recovery Month comes to a close today, we wanted to take a bit of time an reflect on the meaning of recovery. In truth, recovery can mean different things to different people.

A general definition for recovery is “a return to a normal state of health, mind, or strength,” but that doesn’t really tell the whole story in terms of addiction.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), their working definition of recovery is: ” A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential.”

samhsarecovdefThrough the Recovery Support Strategic Initiative, SAMHSA has delineated four major dimensions that support a life in recovery. These areas encompass what are often considered the most important parts of life, although some may feel that family and religion could be added. But, these can also be part of the greater category of community, below.

  • Health – Overcoming or managing one’s disease(s) or symptoms—for example, abstaining from use of alcohol, illicit drugs, and non-prescribed medications if one has an addiction problem— and for everyone in recovery, making informed, healthy choices that support physical and emotional wellbeing.
  • Home – A stable and safe place to live.
  • Purpose – Meaningful daily activities, such as a job, school, volunteerism, family caretaking, or creative endeavors, and the independence, income and resources to participate in society.
  • Community – Relationships and social networks that provide support, friendship, love, and hope.

They also have 10 Guiding Principles of Recovery, which include Hope, Person-Driven, Many Pathways, Holistic, Peer Support, Relational, Culture, Addresses Trauma, Strengths/Responsibility, and Respect.

Regardless of what each person’s individual definition of recovery may be, we feel it is imperative for us all to be supportive of one another in this journey. Just because your definition may include things that others do not, it doesn’t mean they are wrong or somehow missing something. Yes, it’s fine to share opinions and successes, but they shouldn’t come at the expense of someone else’s progress in their own lives.

Instead, let’s celebrate not just recovery, but the experience of life as a whole, for these are the reasons for living in the first place. If you would like help getting started on your path to recovery, contact us today to speak with a treatment consultant who can help you find appropriate resources.

Surgeon General Asks All Doctors to Help Reduce Prescription Opioid Problem

sgrxThe 19th Surgeon General of the United States of America, Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A., has issued a landmark letter to all physicians seeking help to address the opioid epidemic in the country. He acknowledges the critical role that doctors have played in partially creating the problem through the over-prescription of narcotics, while at the same time asserts that they can help to greatly reduce the crisis as well.

“Everywhere I travel, I see communities devastated by opioid overdoses. I meet families too ashamed to seek treatment for addiction,” Dr. Murthy wrote, citing that overdose deaths have quadrupled in America since 1999.

He also noted that the responsibility is shared with pharmaceutical companies as well as patients, stating, “Nearly two decades ago, we were encouraged to be more aggressive about treating pain, often without enough training and support to do so safely. This coincided with heavy marketing of opioids to doctors. Many of us were even taught – incorrectly – that opioids are not addictive when prescribed for legitimate pain.”

Dr. Murthy asked his fellow physicians to take a pledge to reduce prescription opioid abuse at a special website set up at www.TurnTheTideRx.org, which also includes helpful information on recommended prescribing practices, non-narcotic alternatives for treating pain, resources for patients who become addicted and other helpful information. The goal is to address the problem from all sides within their profession.

“First, we will educate ourselves to treat pain safely and effectively. A good place to start is the enclosed pocket card with the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline. Second, we will screen our patients for opioid use disorder and provide or connect them with evidence-based treatment. Third, we can shape how the rest of the country sees addiction by talking about and treating it as a chronic illness, not a moral failing,” the Surgeon General wrote.

If you have a loved one who is battling an opioid dependency, contact us today to speak with a treatment consultant who can help you find an appropriate rehab center.

Drug-Related Overdose Deaths Reach New High, Predicted to Keep Increasing

drug overdoseThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently announced that drug overdose deaths hit an all-time high, led by a flood of opiate use. Overall, opiods were responsible for about 60% of the 47,000 overdose fatalities in America in 2014. Deaths from heroin specifically jumped over 25%, topping more than 10,000 lives lost. We believe that those numbers are poised to continue rising despite current efforts to curb overdoses.

It is no secret that many people wind up using heroin after they have developed a dependency on prescription opiates. These painkillers were themselves responsible for more than 5,000 fatalities. Despite roughly half the number of associated deaths, there are more than three times the number of people with substance use disorders involving painkillers compared to the number of heroin users.

sud14According to the latest results of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reports that there were about 600,000 people with heroin use disorders in 2014 and 1.9 million people with pain reliever use disorders. Since having abused prescription painkillers is the strongest single factor contributing to heroin use, there is a very real threat that the number of heroin-related overdose deaths could surge past 20,000 annually if not remedied.

“The increasing number of deaths from opioid overdose is alarming. The opioid epidemic is devastating American families and communities. To curb these trends and save lives, we must help prevent addiction and provide support and treatment to those who suffer from opioid use disorders. This report also shows how important it is that law enforcement intensify efforts to reduce the availability of heroin, illegal fentanyl, and other illegal opioids, CDC Director Tom Frieden stated in a release announcing the recent findings.

There is no one single way to treat opiate addiction. There are many valuable therapeutic procedures that can help the process and a wide variety of rehabilitation programs available. If you know someone in need of help for an addiction to heroin, painkillers or any other drug, contact us today for help locating a facility.

Marijuana Use and Addiction Sharply Increase

marijuanaA recent study showed that marijuana use among adults more than doubled in just a dozen years. The results were published in JAMA Psychiatry last month. Researchers found that the percentage of adults who used marijuana in 2001 was about 4.1, but that number ballooned to 9.5 by 2013.

Many experts believe that marijuana use has increased even more since then, but this was the latest information available for comparison. What the study also showed is that the amount of people who were developing marijuana use disorders was increasing as well, not just in overall number, but also the percentage of users.

The lead author of the study was Deborah Hasin, an epidemiology professor at Columbia University. She recently commented to CBS News that, “the trend upward in marijuana use indicates that more adults are at risk for marijuana-related adverse consequences, including the risk of marijuana use disorders (abuse or dependence) that we showed. Our findings are consistent with the studies of others that have shown increases in problems such cannabis-related emergency room visits and fatal vehicle crashes.”

As a result of the few states that have voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana by adults, millions more people have been viewing the drug as being less harmful than it can be. Many are still under the misguided concept that it is not an addictive drug, yet each year there are an overwhelming number of people who seek treatment to end their marijuana addiction.

Comprehensive Approach Needed to Tackle Addiction

docandpatientThere is likely no single answer to explain why the drug abuse problem in this country is so bad, however there does seem to be one issue that may be adding to the problem. Several decades ago the knowledge and understanding surrounding addiction was minimal. The topic of addiction was rarely discussed and many people considered it a moral failing and shunned addicts.

During this time insurance companies were left to make up their own policies regarding treatment and essentially chose to compensate for the least amount of counseling available, if at all. Identifying drug addiction as a medical concern is something that has only recently occurred, and while the concept may still be relatively new, it does need to be quickly refined and streamlined.

Until very recently, most insurance companies required addicts to first enroll in an outpatient program and would only approve a residential facility after relapse following a lower level of care. Insisting on this as a first step can be extremely harmful to those trying to overcome their addictions to drugs and alcohol using the most effective means available. Experts agree that addicts need intense, inpatient counseling for a minimum of 30 days, however 90 days or more is suggested.

Now that insurance companies are being required to fund more serious methods of treatment, the healthcare community should to come together and standardize the care for those struggling with addiction in some areas, while not stifling the necessity of having a variety of options for different scenarios.

Sometimes the problem is that people are on different pages throughout the network that is supposed to be supporting rehabilitation. From legislators and other government personnel, to treatment providers, primary healthcare professionals, insurance companies and families, having a greater understanding of not only all of the best practices in each area shared but also a more clearly defined goal would be most beneficial.

Researchers Seek Non-Addictive Painkillers

Handling chronic and acute pain has long been a problem in our society. Long ago it was a problem that was largely ignored by the medical community. If you suffered from back pain or nerve pain you were expected to find ways of coping with it. A few decades ago this viewpoint changed dramatically when more prescription painkillers came onto the market. Doctors were prescribing the addictive drugs for all sorts of pain issues, not realizing how addictive the pills were going to be for some people. As a nation, we have realized that the over-prescription of narcotic painkillers is a real problem, however there still needs to be a way to address pain.

Prescription drug abuse is one of the leading causes of death in our country. Addicts oftentimes become hooked on the pills because they were given a prescription for some sort of pain issue. Since the pills also produce a euphoric effect as well as temporarily masking the pain, many people develop addictions to the narcotics.

Once the dependency is created, addicts tend to start abusing heroin as well. Ingesting heroin allows the addict to feel the same high they would receive if they took a pill, but heroin is stonger, cheaper and easier to obtain. Federal and state government agencies continue to seek solutions for the prescription painkiller epidemic. One road of discovery points to finding a new way to treat pain so that other people will not be sucked into a pain pill or heroin addiction.

Scientists believe they are closer than ever to developing a way to treat pain without the creating more addicts in our society. Cora Therapeutics recently came out to say that they are developing a pain reliever that has proven to be safer than other painkillers currently on the market. By “safer”, the company means that there is less chance for addiction with these new pills than there are with the leading prescription pain remedies. However, as has been seen with many other types of prescription drugs, dependency cannot be absolutely ruled out.

If more doctors begin prescribing these less addictive painkillers, it would seem that a much needed shift in the addiction problem may occur. While this will not stop people from becoming addicts, and it certainly will not cure those who are already addicted, it could be a positive step in the right direction.